Globally Inspired Indoor Outdoor Living For The Australian Lifestyle
Globally Inspired Indoor Outdoor Living For The Australian Lifestyle

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Textural Moodboard- Turning Inspiration into Real-life Palettes

Satara Sales - Tuesday, May 29, 2018

You may have heard of the Danish term “hygge” which is the design world’s current obsession. Loosely translated to comfort, or cosy, the word holds great meaning to the Danish people (and the Norwegians too, who share the words same meaning). For them, the idea of being comfortable, enjoying life’s simple pleasures and creating this atmosphere within their homes is so important. They achieve this through the use of candles, soft furnishings, slow cooking, reading, woollen socks…. You catch the drift. A key element of hygge is texture. Consider the Scandinavian homes you may have seen in magazines. Soft wools, raw timbers, baskets, knitted throws and reindeer hides are plentiful. In the pursuit of hygge, including various textures in your home is just one of the many benefits.


While texture may bring the visual and literal idea of comfort into the room, it’s also a celebration of true materiality. Texture is not just wool or felt, it comes in different forms. The beauty of timber and its innate characteristics are seen. Rope, woven materials from nature, leather and linens also add to the story. While glossy finishes, metals and flat surfaces are a texture in their own right, they are cool and need balancing with rawer materials if you’re trying to achieve a warm and homely look. Textural palettes suit all homes, even those which are cutting edge contemporary, it’s just a matter of how you apply this palette to fit within the style you’re aiming for.

Coastal homes work well with a highly textural palette, as do rural properties. They reflect the outdoors and the natural location of the property. By adding rope, woven materials, sisal rugs, linen drapes or upholstery and timbers, you are instantly creating a casual, eclectic and inviting space. These textures sit back with either a neutrals palette (such as all white) for a fresh look, or rich colours for a statelier and formal feel. Teamed with accessories, this is the perfect textural interior. Think: baskets of timber, pinecones or magazines, woven lamp shades, drift wood, linen or velvet cushions and other finds from nature.

More contemporary and clean-lined homes can also benefit from the textural palette. Even the most modern home can have a feature of timber (be it in joinery or a stand-alone piece of furniture) or cow hide rug. In some ways, the inclusion of texture needs to be considered more carefully in these spaces. Each item is sculptural and will be observed individually. An occasional chair is a great place to bring this piece to the contemporary interior. Try one which has elements of woven material, timbers or leather. All homes, no matter how minimal, see value from the warmth that texture brings. It is a home after all!

There are a great deal of places to find inspiration for your textural palette. Seeing the materials together is helpful to form a guide when choosing finishes and furniture. Create a flatlay to refer back to, like the ones which can be seen here. Note that they have variation in their texture. There are layers of softness, rawness and contrasting elements. Layering of texture creates balance and visual interest. Once you’re happy with your flatlay, you can allocate each of the materials to an actual finish, furniture item or accessory in your home. Some may be large, such as timber floors, while others will be small, such as a linen cushion. Keep coming back to the board to ensure you have each of the materials ticked off in the interior.

Textural combinations that are unexpected form beautiful points of interest in the home. Think outside the square and know there are no real “rules” as such. Team felt and leather, rope and timber or metal with timber. Find balance however and for every cool material, try to counter this with some warmth.

Nature is one of the greatest forms of inspiration and the provider of so much textural warmth for our homes. This doesn’t just have to be large items as well, like a dining table or kitchen joinery. Adding plants, flowers, beach-walk finds and anything else from the environment can be the way to include the warmth without the expense of a whole home overhaul. If you’re working within a budget, try other smaller accessories or furniture pieces. A timber tray on your coffee table, some new linen cushions or woven candle holders. These are items which will never date, as timeless as it comes when talking interiors.

Don’t forget to start with the flatlay or moodboard. Always an anchor point to refer back to if you get a little lost.


Trend Forecasting - Sustainability Matters

Satara Sales - Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Trend forecasters have seen sustainability as a hot topic for some time now, citing a more global awareness and education of the issue as one of the key factors. We see it as more than a trend though, more as a responsibility of our company in the broader design industry. Luckily, there are so many beautiful materials and design options available for specifiers and customers! 

Many of the trends explore concepts of finding beauty in natural materials and celebrating imperfections which can be found in older materials and furniture. Even giving a second life to much-loved items. These ideas are helpful in contributing to a more environmentally friendly home and a clearer conscious for all involved. It also pushes the design industry to create new ways of thinking about manufacturing, quality, longevity and materials. It’s a win-win for the environment, the designer and the end-user.

So how can you implement these considered designs and materials into your own home?

Buy Once, Buy Well

As the adage goes, buy once, buy well certainly rings true when it comes to furniture and interior design products. While it may seem difficult to budget for such items, in the long run it makes sense to make an investment with the best you can afford. Quality products, materials and warranties mean that you will be replacing your items less frequently therefore it can make financial sense as well as lessening waste and landfill. Good quality furniture and materials are also worth refurbishing down the track too, another win for the environment.

Image by Satara via [www.satara.com.au] Featuring Satara's Bukawu Daybed

Natural, Sustainable Materials

What is considered sustainable and what’s not can be quite a difficult area to navigate, with so many brands and designers claiming their product (in all consumer areas, not just interiors!) is sustainable. There are so many wonderful options which cause minimum impact on the environment, such as natural materials which grow and can be replenished quickly, such as bamboo, rattan, willow and other grasses. Other materials may be reclaimed and given a second life, such as recycled timbers which are a beautiful addition to any home. New technology is also pushing the boundaries and HDPE plastics are being used in outdoor furniture. This special type of plastic is not only hard wearing but recyclable too.


Design by Martin J Scott Design featuring Satara's Roxanne Lounge Chairs

Something Old, Given New Life

The next time you’re considering throwing something out, ask yourself if there’s a way to refurbish the piece before dismissing it. Re-upholstery and restoring timber products are a great place to start. Even if you still want that gorgeous new armchair, perhaps the old one can be covered in a beautiful new fabric and find a home elsewhere! In turn, there are so many places to find unwanted furniture which can become a great weekend project involving paint and a staple gun.

Image via [www.juxtoposition.com]

A Whole Lifecycle Considered

It’s easy to forget about products once we no longer have a need for them. Even good quality pieces can come to an end. But then what? Natural materials and HDPE like those mentioned above are excellent examples of this. They’re able to return to nature or given a new, different life. It’s our responsibility to consider the WHOLE lifecycle of a product, not just while it’s in our homes.

“Half House” by Atticus & Milo. Photo by Shannon Mcgrath

The Bigger Picture

Sustainability is multifaceted and complex. There’s the materials, the manufacturing and technologies. But there’s also the communities which are involved at the very core of furniture and other products production. Who’s making it and how are traditional skills maintained? Most reputable companies who import or manufacture products will have this information on hand- if they’re committed to the bigger picture.

Photo by Michael Mauney

The Future

There are some brilliant minds and visionaries out there and the future is looking bright. At a recent trend forecasting seminar, we saw all sorts of fascinating things, from a chair made of leaves to furniture made from trash and even tiles made from recycled television sets! The future of design is exciting for those who want to take the leap…

Simon Kern’s Beleaf Chair, made from fallen leaves


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